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20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
there are three exceptions -- uc-berkeley, ucla, the university of michigan, they did not garner the same amount of racial and ethnic diversity using alternatives. but what is notable is that those three universities are the ones that are most likely to draw on a national pool of applicants, which means that the number of black and hispanic students is likely to be depressed for an artificial reason. these are the schools that have to compete with other schools on an unfair playing field against competitors who are free to continue to use racial preferences in admissions. so a highly talented students of color who gets into uc- berkeley without a racial preference is also likely to be admitted to an even more competitive institution like stanford with a racial preference. it is not surprising that university of michigan, uc- berkeley, and ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions which do not to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduate school? rick sander is here from ucla law school. we will hear from him about the
do that. watch ucla beat cal. >> plenty. >> rosemary is working on a nice forecast tonight? >> bring along the jacket, make sure kids are bundled up. we are expecting an on show breeze, partly cloudy skies, and with the breeze begins to blow it, cools things down. which means if you head into the city, expect the same. outside the doors, partly cloudy skies, fog reported over part of the north bay valley locations as well as areas near the golden gate, and low clouds have slipped into the bay. partly cloudy skies, and a slightly cooler day. 71 for santa rows tax 70 degrees for mountain view, low to mid-60s in the city of san francisco. at some point, some scat may enter the picture -- some scattered showers may enter the picture. we get into monday night, maybe a few sprinkles over tahoe, occasions of the system off the coast, moving -- occasions of the system off the coast moving in. we are still from too to four -- two to four days out. looks like the best shot, temperatures not budging a lot. low to mid-70s in the forecast inland. low 70s at the coast. >>> just a few hours, the op
academic colleagues at ucla where i've been getting a phd. for the first one i'd like to make, one thing that sets the tea party apart from many others if they have a very traditional review. so essentially, they have this view america's land of opportunity and that all people regardless of backgrounds can succeed. now this is not to say, but they have this even more so and this is how the answer poll questions and how they help explain a lot of there there policy positions that other people have a hard time understanding. the scope of this. so these are some signs i took at a washington d.c. tea party protest here by the capital. you often see signs like this. don't spread my wealth. spread my work ethic. stop punishing and rewarding failure. this is all part of a common thing. and for this to make sense, i think we should go for some polling data. i'm going to show you some polling numbers that i've conducted with the recent rupaul that i directed the foundation. why actually had an opportunity to ask americans in general, but also tea partiers about how they perceive the fairness abou
at ucla. we could talk about this for a long time, but one of the things that, you know, what you need in order to get the median voter argument to work is a distribution of voters that is centered on the median obviously. >> right. right. right. >> so if we really think the country is moving away from the middle, that's going to change the behavior of parties and candidates. okay. i'm not sure that we're there yet, but to answer your question, if the people who are at the meed i can't remember are a little less sophisticated politically, what is that going to do? you know, i think another thing we know from coding a bunch of ads over the years, candidates make big statements in their advertising. >> yes. >> they tend not to be specific. we call those valance ads. the reason they do that, so that they can be all things to all people. they're like sort of the hero in a big budget film. they need to be every man. >> mitt romney, of course, has taken a very specific strategy in this campaign to not come out with specifics. in fact, he's been criticized by the political press with not comi
administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in october 2011 he focused on the impact that
years of the reagan administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in oct
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)